Events

Events

Each year, the Department of Sociology invites a number of guest speakers to present on their scholarship. Recent speakers have presented research on a variety of topics, including political sociology, race, gender, health, sexuality, and criminology.

The Colloquium is held in 457 Berkey Hall on Fridays from 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM. For more information on this year's speakers, as well as past speakers, please click here.

Summer Session One Begins

Date & Time: May 14, 2018 - All Day

Department Closed

Date & Time: May 28, 2018 - All Day

Dissertation Defense: Matthew Houser

Date & Time: Jun 12, 2018, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Matthew Houser, Ph.D. candidate, will be defending his dissertation on "Nitrogen Fertilizer Management in the Context of the Mid- western Corn Agro-Ecological System: An Environmental Sociological Analysis" Tuesday, June 12th. The defense is open to those inside the department as well as the public. 

Summer Session One Ends

Date & Time: Jun 28, 2018 - All Day

Summer Session Two Begins

Date & Time: Jul 02, 2018 - All Day

Department Closed

Date & Time: Jul 04, 2018 - All Day

Summer Session Two Ends

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2018 - All Day

Faculty Retreat

Date & Time: Aug 24, 2018, 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location: Henry Center

Fall Classes Begin

Date & Time: Aug 29, 2018 - All Day

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Sep 07, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Sep 28, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Medicine, Health, and Society Seminar

Date & Time: Oct 17, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

stef shuster, Assistant Professor of Lyman Briggs College & Sociology

The Quackery Quagmire in Transgender Medicine, 1950-1970

 

Linda Hunt, Professor of Anthropology

Racial Profiling in Clinical Medicine

 

Richard E. Lucas, MSU Foundation Professor of Psychology

Do Life Circumstances Matter for Subjective Well-Being?

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Oct 19, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Speaker Series: Dr. Stefan Bargheer

Date & Time: Nov 02, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

At the center of Stefan Bargheer’s account of bird watching, field ornithology, and nature conservation in Britain and Germany stands the question of how values change over time and how individuals develop moral commitments. Using life history data derived from written narratives and oral histories, Moral Entanglements follows the development of conservation from the point in time at which the greatest declines in bird life took place to the current efforts in large-scale biodiversity conservation and environmental policy within the European Union. While often depicted as the outcome of an environmental revolution that has taken place since the 1960s, Bargheer demonstrates to the contrary that the relevant practices and institutions that shape contemporary conservation have evolved gradually since the early nineteenth century. Moral Entanglements further shows that the practices and institutions in which bird conservation is entangled differ between the two countries. In Britain, birds derived their meaning in the context of the game of bird watching as a leisure activity. Here birds are now, as then, the most popular and best protected taxonomic group of wildlife due to their particularly suitable status as toys in a collecting game, turning nature into a playground. In Germany, by contrast, birds were initially part of the world of work. They were protected as useful economic tools, rendering services of ecological pest control in a system of agricultural production modeled after the factory shop floor. Based on this extensive analysis, Bargheer formulates a sociology of morality informed by a pragmatist theory of value.

Qualifying Paper Presentation

Date & Time: Nov 09, 2018, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Visit us in Berkey Hall room 457 to hear a presentation by Zoey Lai titled: “What Contributes to Life Satisfaction in China? Subjective Well-Being of Internal Migrants Form a Generational Prespective”

Speaker Series: Dr. Anna S. Mueller

Date & Time: Nov 09, 2018, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Dr. Anna S. Mueller, Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago, will be joining us on November 9th. The discussion is to be announced, thus, stay tuned for details. 

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Nov 09, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Nov 30, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Dec 07, 2018, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Jan 11, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Speaker Series: Dr. Lawrence Busch

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2019, 12:00 PM - 1:10 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

"Back to the Future: An STS Approach to Markets"

As the late Leigh Star noted, infrastructure is that often invisible stuff all around us that is both relational and ecological. I employ the tools of STS in an attempt to unpack infrastructure with respect to markets. Markets may be examined as (1) institutions, (2) the sum of particular sorts of economic transactions and (3) places where politics is enacted. Contemporary economists have focused on the sum of transactions, largely ignoring institutions and politics. However, given the performative character of economics, I need also to examine how economics, in its theoretical treatment of markets, has influenced the development of actual markets. Finally, any ecological study of markets must also include standards, a relatively new form of infrastructure taken for granted by most economists. Based on preliminary investigations, I propose three hypotheses: First, actual markets (must) fail to deliver distributive justice. Second, economics as a discipline lags behind the actual changes in the nature of markets. Third, standards have taken on an increasingly important position as infrastructural devices that shape markets, first supporting and then undermining neoclassical approaches. Institutional economists of a century ago understood that a pragmatic approach, emphasizing the evolutionary character of markets, allowed construction of perspectives that change with the times. A re-reading of their work opens new vistas for STS approaches to markets.

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Jan 25, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Feb 01, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Sandra Harding GenCen Abbott-Haskin Endowed Lectureship

Date & Time: Feb 06, 2019, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: International Center, Room 303

Join us for the inaugural installment of the biennial GenCen Abbott-Haskin Lecture Series. This year's speaker is Dr. Sandra Harding, world-renowned feminist philosopher and theorist and Distinguished Professor from UCLA.

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Feb 08, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Feb 22, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

MSU Latinx Film Festival

Date & Time: Feb 22, 2019, 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Location: MSU RCAH Theater (Snyder-Phillips Hall)

In the wake of the historic government shutdown, LxFF is proud to bring two highly acclaimed documentaries on the U.S.-México border to the greater Lansing area for their mid-Michigan premieres: Through the Repellent Fence (MoMA/SXSW) and The Wall (2018 Pulitzer Prize). We’re also happy to present two short films on the sanctuary movement by emerging filmmakers: Dangerous Times | Rebellious Responses and Walking for Ded.

 

The U.S.-México border and the sanctuary movement in Michigan. Two topics inextricably linked by immigration policies, state violence and imperialism, but also through attempts to resist xenophobia, contest coercion and transform the way we think about land, migration and human dignity. Two topics with shared themes: ONE NIGHT ONLY! 

 

For more info on the films see: https://msulatinxfilmfestival.com.

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Mar 01, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Dissertation Defense: Samuel Mindes

Date & Time: Mar 15, 2019, 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 209

Sam’s dissertation looks at migration in North America; however, he looks beyond the heavily studied flow of migrants into the United States. In this project, he looks at migration from the U.S., specifically focusing on the emigration of native-born Americans to Canada and Mexico in the last several decades. Migration in North America is much more diverse than a single migration flow, yet this American emigration flow, which is both growing and changing, remains absent from scholarly research. American citizens living abroad are important domestic political, social and economic actors, who hold voting rights in the U.S., preserve social and familial bonds, and maintains financial connections even from abroad. Sam’s dissertation investigates this emigration flow, guided by research questions that: explore changes in demographic composition; examine the portrayal of American emigration in mass media; and compare the depiction of American emigration on secondary data to the narrative told by the mass media.

Speaker Series: Liza Weinstein

Date & Time: Mar 15, 2019, 12:00 PM - 1:10 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Please join us for a speaker series titled "Resettling the City: Refugee Settlement and Emerging Landscape of Post-Partition Delhi and Bombay" by Liza Weinstein, Associate Professor of Sociology at Northeastern University. 

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Mar 15, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Mar 22, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Mar 29, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: Apr 05, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Dissertation Proposal Defense: Jihan Mohammed

Date & Time: Apr 12, 2019, 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 313 IPSR

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Apr 12, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Speaker Series: Dr. Andrew Jorgenson

Date & Time: Apr 15, 2019, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

"Emissions, Inequality, and Human Well-Being"

In this talk I provide an overview of my ongoing collaborative research streams that focus on various interconnections between anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and industrial pollution, forms of social inequality, and human well-being. This theoretically-engaged research involves the combining of social and environmental datasets at various units of analysis, from the facility level (e.g., analyses of the majority of the world’s fossil-fueled power plants) up to the national level (e.g., analyses for the majority of the world’s nations), and the use of various modeling techniques, including longitudinal regression analysis, multilevel regression analysis, and qualitative comparative analysis. Besides contributing to various areas of research within sociology, this work is intended to help situate fundamental sociological principles, especially the importance of social-structural context, more centrally within sustainability science.

Dissertation Defense: Seung-won Choi

Date & Time: Apr 17, 2019, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall Room 313

2019 Research Symposium

Date & Time: Apr 19, 2019, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Departmental Meeting

Date & Time: Apr 26, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: 457 Berkey Hall

Dissertation Defense: Mellissa Wright

Date & Time: Apr 26, 2019, 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

"Mentorship Matters: The Role of Mentorship in Social Capital Building and Student Achievement Outcomes"

A number of qualitative studies examining student achievement outcomes in higher education show that access to social capital is an important predictor of student success. Critical Race Theory (CRT), and other qualitative studies, examining student outcomes have operationalized social capital in terms of access to information. Most of these qualitative studies found that a student's social class and race mediated their access to quality mentors who could provide access to critical social capital. In this study, data from the longitudinal ADD Health Study was used in order to test the generalizability of findings in the CRT and qualitative literature. Logistic regressions using odds ratios were used to examine the relationship between individual characteristics found to be at risk of early attrition in higher education and types of mentors identified by the respondents. Logistic regressions using odds ratios were also used to determine if there were any relationship between individual characteristics found to be protective against early attrition and types of mentors identified by respondents. Finally, a variety of regressions were run in order to determine if there were any relationships between individual risk factors, protective factors, mentors, and educational outcomes including access to higher education in Waves 3 and 4, attrition, completion, and educational aspirations. 

Dissertation Proposal Defense: Jennifer Lai

Date & Time: May 01, 2019, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457

Like other chronic diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence is increasing globally and disparately across local, regional, and national contexts. Given the long-term economic, physical, and emotional costs of this disease, health care professionals and scholars alike are striving to identify the major causal mechanisms of these disparities. Their increased focus on environmental drivers of health signals an entrée of the physical, spatial, and temporal dimensions of T2DM into disparities analyses. However, the inclusion of these dimensions has so far proceeded in an atheoretical manner, such that scholars may be ignoring key environmental factors related to T2DM.

To address this problem, I am proposing to investigate how environmental factors matter for the spatial distribution of T2DM in the United States. I will do this by examining how knowledge is produced on ‘the environment’ within T2DM medical discourse, then translated into explanatory variables appropriate for disparities research. This project fulfills an urgent need to more precisely define and organize how environmental factors are being incorporated into scientific studies in order to better understand how environmental factors reinforce socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic-based health disparities.

Dissertation Defense: Kelly Birch Maginot

Date & Time: May 02, 2019, 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall Room 457

Advisory Committee Meeting

Date & Time: May 03, 2019, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: Berkey Hall 457