Samantha Fox

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Samantha Fox

  • Title: Assistant Professor
  • Email: foxsama2@msu.edu    Phone: 517-353-1979
  • Office: 428B Berkey Hall

Degree: Binghamton University, 2017

Biography:

Samantha Fox is a fixed-term Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Michigan State University. She received her PhD from Binghamton University’s Sociology Department in 2017 for her dissertation titled On the Margins of a Mine, On the Margins of Capitalism: Indigenous Autonomy and Extractive Development in the Highlands of Guatemala. She is developing her research on the effects of extractive development on indigenous communities and community political organization in the face of social and environmental change into a book. Her research interests are rooted in a world-historical approach in the areas of environmental sociology, the political economy of development, indigenous politics and movements, and the sociology of food and agriculture. Samantha has published her work in the Journal of World-Systems Research and Environmental Sociology. A second research project she is involved with examines how economic conditions influence decisions to migrate within a country or across borders and how global householding transforms the practice of community autonomy in Central America and China.

Research Areas: Environmental Sociology, Political Economy, Solidarity and Autonomy, Indigenous Politics and Movements, Extractive Development, Latin America.
Selected Publications:

Under Review. “What is Green Racism? Explaining Green Racism Through American Environmentalism” Critical Sociology.

R&R. “Critical Praxis in Indigenous Communities Confronting Environmental Injustice in the Guatemalan Mining Sector” Environmental Sociology, Special Issue on Deep Intersectionality and Environmental Justice.

2015. “History, Violence, and the Emergence of Guatemala’s Extractive Sector” Environmental Sociology 1(3): 152-165.

2014. “A World-Ecological Perspective on Socio-Ecological Transformation in the Appalachian Coal Industry” Journal of World Systems Research 20(2): 257-280. [with Ben Marley]