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International Distinguished Scholar Dr. Ioannis Papageorgiou to Speak on January 30th, 2013

January 22, 2013

Dr. Ioannis Papageorgiou, internationally distinguished scholar, will present and lead a subsequent discussion in the MSU Sociology Department's graduate seminar on International Inequality and Development, Wednesday, January 30th at 7:00 p.m. in Room 106B Berkey Hall.

Dr. Ioannis Papageorgiou is Associate Professor of European Politics, Migration and Refugee Issues in the School of Politics at the Aristotle University of Thessalonica, Greece.

The title of his brown bag presentation to our graduate students is "Current Immigration, Refugees and Asylum Problems, Patterns and Policies in Greece and the EU."

On Thursday January 31 at 12:00 noon Dr. Papageorgiou will talk on "Greece: The Crisis - Root Causes and European Solutions" at the Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies in the MSU International Center.

 

 

Shu-Fen Kao publishes article on controversies in Taiwan

January 9, 2013

Kao, Shu-Fen (2012). "EMF Controversy in Chigu, Taiwan: Contested Declaration of Risk and Scientific Knowledge Have Implications for Risk Governance." Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 12: 81-97. ( read here)

Teri Swezey, Sociology PhD 2004, walks and bikes 2,255 miles

December 6, 2012

Teri Swezey, (PhD 2004) recently returned to Chapel Hill, NC after walking and riding her bicycle 2,255 miles from Wrightsville Beach, NC to Flagstaff, AZ on behalf of vulnerable elderly and their caregivers as part of SOAR Feat 2012 .

Global Gateways: International Aviation in Metropolitan America

October 30, 2012

Co-author of a journal article with Adie Tomer and Robert Puentes, MSU sociologist Zachary Neal looks at how metropolitan economies expand their global reach through trade and investment, international aviation plays a pivotal role: the movement of people across national borders.

Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks

Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks

October 30, 2012

Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets—roads and bridge, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes—working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected Cities, are made up of human social networks. Richard Florida of The Atlantic Cities magazine sits down with Dr. Neal to discuss his book.

Dr. Hui Liu Receives National Council on Family Relations Professional Paper Award

October 16, 2012

Dr. Hui (Cathy) Liu has been selected to receive the National Council on Family Relations Professional Paper Award for her paper entitled "Marital Dissolution and Self-Rated Health: Age Trajectories and Birth Cohort Variations" published in the the Family and Health Section journal of Social Science & Medicine in 2012.

Trans-Kin: A Guide to Family and Friends

October 4, 2012

Congratulations to Cameron T. Whitley, current sociology Ph.D. student at Michigan State University and Eleanor A. Hubbard, Senior Instructor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder, longtime friends that have co-authored this anthology: a unique sampling of Trans-Kin voices as they tell their life experiences and a resource for SOFFA's (Significant Others, Family members, Friends and Allies) as they come to terms with the transgender status of loved ones.

Yesterday’s brutally repressive former USSR is today’s wracked with greed Russia

Yesterday’s brutally repressive former USSR is today’s wracked with greed Russia

September 13, 2012

The brutally repressive Soviet Union MSU sociologist professor Vladimir Shlapentokh left behind 33 years ago may have opened its borders to the world, but today’s Russia has become wracked with greed, corruption and mass emigration that threaten the nation’s future.

 

 

Witch hunts are common and sometimes deadly in the tea plantation of Japaiguri, India.

Witch hunts are common and sometimes deadly in the tea plantation of Japaiguri, India.

September 4, 2012

Dr. Soma Chaudhuri, assistant professor of sociology and criminal justice, spent seven months studying witch hunts in her native India and discovered that the economic self-help groups have made it part of their agenda to defend their fellow plantation workers against the hunts. (read full news article)

Mortality From the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919: The Case of India

July 18, 2012

Sociology graduate student, Jennifer Wray, along with Siddharth Chandra, and Goran Kuljanin, published an abstract on the estimates of worldwide mortality from the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, which vary widely, from 15 million to 100 million.

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